By Type

Horsetail

As medicine
The leaves and stems can be steamed for nasal congestion, colds and stomach ailments.
As food
The root tubercles, or dazho zhii (translated from Teetł'it means “mouse food”) can be eaten raw.
As pot cleaner 
The coarse green stems can be gathered and used to scrub pots and clean dishes.
Source: Andre, Alestine and Alan Fehr, Gwich'in Ethnobotany, 2nd ed. (2002)
English

Yellowberry

For food
The white flowers come out in June and the berries which resemble orange raspberries, are ready to pick in late July when they are soft and plump. Along with blueberries and cranberries, yellowberries are a favourite in the area. People usually eat them right away, or save them for a special occasion or to give away as a gift. In the old days people stored yellowberries in birch bark baskets under the moss, where the permafrost kept them from spoiling and, in winter, from freezing too hard.
English

Red currant

As food
This shrub has edible red berries. The berries are picked in late summer, and either eaten raw or made into jam. As medicine. A tea made from the whole plant (leaves and stems) is used for stomach ailments.
Source: Andre, Alestine and Alan Fehr, Gwich'in Ethnobotany, 2nd ed. (2002)
 
As medicine
The leaves of the red currant plant are crushed and applied to burns.
English

Raspberry

As food
The red fruit of the raspberry is edible and very sweet tasting.
Source: Andre, Alestine and Alan Fehr, Gwich'in Ethnobotany, 2nd ed. (2002)
 
As medicine
The stem and leaves of the raspberry plant are made into a tea and drunk to treat diarrhea.
Source: Andre, Alestine, Nan t'aih nakwits'inahtsìh (The Land Gives Us Strength) (2006)
 
English

High-bush cranberry

As medicine

The leaves of the high-bush cranberry plant are crushed and applied to relieve bee-stings and burns.

Source: Andre, Alestine, Nan t'aih nakwits'inahtsìh (The Land Gives Us Strength) (2006)

English

Bladderwort

As medicine:

Either the leaves or the whole bladderwort plant including the roots are made into a tea to treat kidney or bladder infection. The bladderwort and the horsetail plant are used in the same way for bladder ailments. Ruth usually makes her bladderwort tea strong but dilutes it before drinking it. Ruth said,

English

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